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The island of missing trees / Elif Shafak.

By: Publisher: Great Britain : Penguin Random House, 2022Copyright date: ©2021Description: 355 pages ; 20 cmContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • unmediated
Carrier type:
  • volume
ISBN:
  • 9780241988725
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Summary: It is 1974 on the island of Cyprus. Two teenagers, from opposite sides of a divided land, meet at a tavern in the city they both call home. The tavern is the only place that Kostas, who is Greek and Christian, and Defne, who is Turkish and Muslim, can meet, in secret, hidden beneath the blackened beams from which hang garlands of garlic, chilli peppers and wild herbs. This is where one can find the best food in town, the best music, the best wine. But there is something else to the place: it makes one forget, even if for just a few hours, the world outside and its immoderate sorrows. In the centre of the tavern, growing through a cavity in the roof, is a fig tree. This tree will witness their hushed, happy meetings, their silent, surreptitious departures; and the tree will be there when the war breaks out, when the capital is reduced to rubble, when the teenagers vanish and break apart. Decades later in north London, sixteen-year-old Ada Kazantzakis has never visited the island where her parents were born. Desperate for answers, she seeks to untangle years of secrets, separation and silence. The only connection she has to the land of her ancestors is a Ficus Carica growing in the back garden of their home.
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Fiction Fiction Conde Library Conde Library Fiction F SHAF (Browse shelf(Opens below)) On reserve R147615LPYMB

Mild Mature Content

It is 1974 on the island of Cyprus. Two teenagers, from opposite sides of a divided land, meet at a tavern in the city they both call home. The tavern is the only place that Kostas, who is Greek and Christian, and Defne, who is Turkish and Muslim, can meet, in secret, hidden beneath the blackened beams from which hang garlands of garlic, chilli peppers and wild herbs. This is where one can find the best food in town, the best music, the best wine. But there is something else to the place: it makes one forget, even if for just a few hours, the world outside and its immoderate sorrows. In the centre of the tavern, growing through a cavity in the roof, is a fig tree. This tree will witness their hushed, happy meetings, their silent, surreptitious departures; and the tree will be there when the war breaks out, when the capital is reduced to rubble, when the teenagers vanish and break apart. Decades later in north London, sixteen-year-old Ada Kazantzakis has never visited the island where her parents were born. Desperate for answers, she seeks to untangle years of secrets, separation and silence. The only connection she has to the land of her ancestors is a Ficus Carica growing in the back garden of their home.

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The Pymble Libraries acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Country on which we learn and create. We pay respect to the Elders past, present and emerging, and extend that respect to other First Nations People within the Pymble Ladies’ College community. We gain inspiration from First Nations Peoples’ enduring connection to culture, community, and story.

I would like to acknowledge the traditional Custodians of the land on which we are gathered, the Darramuragal people. And pay our respects to all elders, past, present and emerging.
As we remember that under this concrete and asphalt this land is, was and always will be sacred to Aboriginal people.

The Pymble Libraries acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Country on which we learn and create. We pay respect to the Elders past, present and emerging, and extend that respect to other First Nations People within the Pymble Ladies’ College community. We gain inspiration from First Nations Peoples’ enduring connection to culture, community, and story.