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Wahhābism : the history of a militant Islamic movement / Cole M. Bunzel.

By: Publisher: Princeton, New Jersey : Princeton University Press, [2023]Copyright date: ©2023Description: xvii, 385 pages : illustrations ; 25 cmContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • unmediated
Carrier type:
  • volume
ISBN:
  • 9780691241593
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 297.81409 23
Contents:
Introduction -- 1. Muḥammad ibn ʻAbd al-Wahhāb and His Discontents -- 2. The Doctrine of Ibn ʻAbd al-Wahhāb I: The Taymiyyan Background -- 3. The Doctrine of Ibn ʻAbd al-Wahhāb II: The Key Components -- 4. The Warpath of Early Wahhābism: The First Saudi State (1741-1818) -- 5. The Reassertion of Enmity: The Second Saudi State (1823-1887) -- 6. The Persistence of Enmity: The Rashīdī Interregnum (1887-1902) -- 7. The Decline of Enmity: The Rise of the Third Saudi State (1902-1932) -- Conclusion: The Fall and Rise of Militant Wahhābism.
Summary: In the mid-eighteenth century, a controversial Islamic movement arose in the central Arabian region of Najd that forever changed the political landscape of the Arabian Peninsula and the history of Islamic thought. Its founder, Muhammad ibn ʻAbd al-Wahhab, taught that most professed Muslims were polytheists due to their veneration of Islamic saints at tombs and gravesites. He preached that true Muslims, those who worship God alone, must show hatred and enmity toward these polytheists and fight them in jihad. Cole Bunzel tells the story of Wahhabism from its emergence in the 1740s to its taming and coopting by the modern Saudi state in the 1920s, and shows how its legacy endures in the ideologies of al-Qaʻida and the Islamic State. Drawing on a wealth of primary source materials, Bunzel traces the origins of Wahhabi doctrine to the religious thought of medieval theologian Ibn Taymiyya and examines its development through several generations of Wahhabi scholars. While widely seen as heretical and schismatic, the movement nonetheless flourished in central Arabia, spreading across the peninsula under the political authority of the Al Suʻud dynasty until the invading Egyptian army crushed it in 1818. The militant Wahhabi ethos, however, persisted well into the early twentieth century, when the Saudi kingdom used Wahhabism to bolster its legitimacy. This incisive history is the definitive account of a militant Islamic movement founded on enmity toward non-Wahhabi Muslims and that is still with us today in the violent doctrines of Sunni jihadis.
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Conde Library Conde Library Non Fiction 297.814 BUN (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available R148356PPYMB

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- 1. Muḥammad ibn ʻAbd al-Wahhāb and His Discontents -- 2. The Doctrine of Ibn ʻAbd al-Wahhāb I: The Taymiyyan Background -- 3. The Doctrine of Ibn ʻAbd al-Wahhāb II: The Key Components -- 4. The Warpath of Early Wahhābism: The First Saudi State (1741-1818) -- 5. The Reassertion of Enmity: The Second Saudi State (1823-1887) -- 6. The Persistence of Enmity: The Rashīdī Interregnum (1887-1902) -- 7. The Decline of Enmity: The Rise of the Third Saudi State (1902-1932) -- Conclusion: The Fall and Rise of Militant Wahhābism.

In the mid-eighteenth century, a controversial Islamic movement arose in the central Arabian region of Najd that forever changed the political landscape of the Arabian Peninsula and the history of Islamic thought. Its founder, Muhammad ibn ʻAbd al-Wahhab, taught that most professed Muslims were polytheists due to their veneration of Islamic saints at tombs and gravesites. He preached that true Muslims, those who worship God alone, must show hatred and enmity toward these polytheists and fight them in jihad. Cole Bunzel tells the story of Wahhabism from its emergence in the 1740s to its taming and coopting by the modern Saudi state in the 1920s, and shows how its legacy endures in the ideologies of al-Qaʻida and the Islamic State. Drawing on a wealth of primary source materials, Bunzel traces the origins of Wahhabi doctrine to the religious thought of medieval theologian Ibn Taymiyya and examines its development through several generations of Wahhabi scholars. While widely seen as heretical and schismatic, the movement nonetheless flourished in central Arabia, spreading across the peninsula under the political authority of the Al Suʻud dynasty until the invading Egyptian army crushed it in 1818. The militant Wahhabi ethos, however, persisted well into the early twentieth century, when the Saudi kingdom used Wahhabism to bolster its legitimacy. This incisive history is the definitive account of a militant Islamic movement founded on enmity toward non-Wahhabi Muslims and that is still with us today in the violent doctrines of Sunni jihadis.

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The Pymble Libraries acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Country on which we learn and create. We pay respect to the Elders past, present and emerging, and extend that respect to other First Nations People within the Pymble Ladies’ College community. We gain inspiration from First Nations Peoples’ enduring connection to culture, community, and story.